Be Healthy With Magnesium-Rich Foods!

Magnesium is a nutrient that the body needs to stay healthy. Magnesium is important for many processes in the body, including regulating muscle and nerve function, blood sugar levels, and blood pressure and making protein, bone, and DNA. Unfortunately, many people don’t reach the recommended daily intake of 400 mg. However, eating foods high in magnesium can help you meet the daily requirement. With the help of following foods, you can improve your daily magnesium intake.

1. Dark Chocolate
Dark chocolate is as healthy as it is delicious. It’s very rich in magnesium, with 64 mg in a 1-ounce (28 gram) serving. This amounts to 16% of the recommended daily intake (RDI). Dark chocolate is also in high in iron, copper and manganese, and it contains prebiotic fibre that feeds the friendly bacteria in your gut.

2. Avocados
The avocado is an incredibly nutritious fruit and a tasty source of magnesium. One medium avocado provides 58 mg of magnesium, which is 15% of the RDI.Avocados are also high in potassium, B-vitamins and vitamin K. And unlike most fruits, they’re high in fat — especially heart-healthy monounsaturated fat.

3. Nuts
Nuts are nutritious and tasty. Several types are high in magnesium, including almonds, cashews and Brazil nuts. For instance, a 1-oz (28-gram) serving of cashews contains 82 mg of magnesium or 20% of the RDI.
Most nuts are also a good source of fibre and monounsaturated fat and have been shown to improve blood sugar and cholesterol levels in diabetics.

4. Legumes
Legumes are a family of nutrient-dense plants that include lentils, beans, chickpeas, peas and soybeans. They’re very rich in many different nutrients, including magnesium. For instance, a 1-cup serving of cooked black beans contains an impressive 120 mg of magnesium, which is 30% of the RDI. Legumes are also high in potassium and iron, and they’re a major source of protein for vegetarians.

5. Tofu
Tofu is often a staple food in vegetarian diets due to its high protein content. It’s made by pressing soybean milk into soft white curds and is also known as “bean curd.” A 3.5-oz (100-gram) serving has 53 mg of magnesium, which is 13% of the RDI.One serving also provides 10 grams of protein and 10% or more of the RDI for calcium, iron, manganese and selenium.

6. Seeds
Seeds are incredibly healthy. Many contain high amounts of magnesium, including flax, pumpkin and chia seeds.
Pumpkin seeds are a particularly good source, with 150 mg in a 1-oz (28-gram) serving. This amounts to a whopping 37% of the recommended daily intake. In addition, seeds are rich in iron, monounsaturated fat and omega-3 fatty acids.

7. Whole Grains
Grains include wheat, oats and barley, plus pseudocereals like buckwheat and quinoa. When grains are whole, they are excellent sources of many nutrients, including magnesium.
A 1-oz serving of dry buckwheat contains 65 mg of magnesium, which is 16% of the RDI. Many whole grains are also high in B vitamins, selenium, manganese and fibre.

8. Some Fatty Fish
Fish, especially fatty fish, is incredibly nutritious. Many types of fish are high in magnesium. These include salmon, mackerel and halibut.
Half a fillet (178 grams) of salmon contains 53 mg of magnesium, which is 13% of the RDI. It also provides an impressive 39 grams of high-quality protein. Fish is also rich in potassium, selenium, B-vitamins and various other nutrients.

9. Bananas
They are best known for their high potassium content, but you may not have heard that bananas also contain magnesium. One large banana contains 37 mg or 9% of the RDI. Bananas also provide vitamin C, vitamin B6, manganese and fibre.

10. Leafy Greens
Leafy greens are extremely healthy, and many are loaded with magnesium. Greens with significant amounts of magnesium include kale, spinach, collard greens, turnip greens and mustard greens. For instance, a 1-cup serving of cooked spinach has 157 mg of magnesium or 39% of the RDI. In addition, they’re an excellent source of several nutrients, including vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K, iron and manganese.

 

Source:

www.healthline.com

ummahdesign